Depression by Mike Nowlan 2

International Men’s Health Week June 10-16. Mike Nowlan

For Men’s Health Week, the Gatton Star ran a four page feature to promote men’s health. I was invited to contribute, which I did, & I was astounded to open the paper I see me staring out from two pages of feature article. It was a presentation of the address that I gave at Laidley Hospital last November, & this was the first time that the article had been viewed by the general public.

Depression is a very personal thing; so is taking your own life. In writing these articles, I have gone deep into the emotional depths of my inner self in an attempt to help other people to understand the horror that is the Black Hole of suicidal depression.

Having survived those torments, I feel I understand myself better now, & I feel blessed that I went through that suffering because I can now enunciate in real terms just how horrible it is to be afflicted with deep depression.

 Suicidal behaviour among men could be up to three times higher than some estimates, according to ground-breaking research backed by Beyond Blue and Movember.

Every day, approximately six men take their own lives in Australia. These deaths represent a tragic loss of life and potential, and are devastating for families, friends, colleagues and communities.

Anxiety & depression conditions are the most common mental health conditions in Australia, affecting over two million Australians every year

While there have been recent improvements in the community talking about and seeking help for anxiety and/or depression, the traditional Australian male still tends to bury the emotions or tough it out. With depression, that can be a one way ticket. As the research shows, many more men could be bottling up what needs to be admitted to & helped. Remember Greg Inglis

said;” It ain’t weak to speak.” My version of that is; “How macho is it to be dead, because

you were too macho to seek help.”

Many of us have problems other than depression: any health issue can be soul destroying for you or those around you. Have the courage to face up to a health issue & deal with it. A friend of mine asked “how many psychiatrists & phycologists does it need to change a light bulb? The answer is: the light bulb has got to want to be changed!”

Substitute you for the light bulb!!

In no way am I suggesting that someone with mental health issues should see a psychiatrist, because I found fantastic help with a nurse at the local doctor’s practice. Down to earth understanding of your situation is what is needed.

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